Day 3: Guia Hill+ Back

I wanted to take Mu Yi to Guia Lighthouse first because she had never been there before.  Situated on top of Guia Hill, out in the general vicinity of the Sands, our walk from the hotel took about 15 minutes.  We entered through the Flora Garden entrance, which is also home to a small zoo and aviary. 

 


 

Guia Hill doubles as a big park and has plenty of exercise equipment, soccer fields, playgrounds and paved enclosures where you can rollerblade, skateboard or do whatever activity you want.  For those who don't want to climb to the top, cable cars are available, but walking up isn't that difficult.  It only takes about 15 minutes from the Flora Garden entrance to the top of the hill and the 25th and final UNESCO site, Guia Fortress.  The fortress was built between 1622 and 1638 and the main attraction today is the chapel on top, which was originally used by Clarist nuns.  The lighthouse beside the chapel dates from 1885 and was the first modern lighthouse in China. 

 


 

Taking pictures inside the Chapel isn't technically allowed, but I don't believe in such rules and Mu Yi was able to sneak in a few good shots.  The wonderful frescoes that adorn the walls were only discovered in 1996 while a gravestone at the Chapel's entrance dates from 1687.  Left nameless, the deceased was memorialised thusly: "One who is buried here does not deserve such an honorable sepulchre as this."  That's almost as nice as another favourite tombstone of mine at the Protestant Cemetery that reads "May He Rest In Piece."  Maybe because he was a musician they used the word 'Piece' and not 'Peace', otherwise, that's just mean and cruel. 

 

             

Under the chapel there's also an air raid shelter, free to anyone who wants to head down and have a look.

 

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