Day 1: Maritime Museum+ Back

After Patio Dos Cules, Mu Yi and I continued towards the Maritime Museum, through an area of town that is a heavy tourist zone, home to 9 UNESCO World Heritage sites.  Formerly a very rich part of Macau, I think all the money has since moved a little east, up to Barra Hill.  Just before we hit the museum, we stumbled onto a small exhibition displaying the packaging of 40 or 50 year old products, mostly of cakes, pastries, candy, cigarettes and wine. 

 

Koi Kei snack shop near A Ma Temple old Macanese candy container old Macau snack exhibit jars of Macau snacks

 

I must admit that Mu Yi was a lot more excited than I was, checking to see what ingredients they used, how much the products used to cost as well as the style of the models from that era.  For my money, those very virtuous babes looked like women from the 50's, and that was one fine decade to be a man.  More feminine they could not have been, and I'd personally love to see that style come back. 
 

old Ieng Kei Bakery snack lid old Macau food seasoning and oils old Port wine wrappers in display case in Macau exhibit old boxes of Macau snacks

 

By 4:30 pm, we had finally reached the last stop of the day, the Maritime Museum.  I tried to buy the museum pass for $25 that gets you into 6 museums over a 5 day period, but that deal has been finished for over 2 years now.  Instead we had to pay full price for the tickets, a whopping $10 each.  Not being into ships or water or fishing or anything of that nature I didn't expect much walking in, but the Maritime Museum really impressed me. 

 

Macau fishing exhibit at the Maritime Museum Macau fishing techniques at the Maritime Museum map of Portuguese Discoveries at the Maritime Museum Portuguese caraval at the Maritime Museum

 

It not only focuses on the lives of Macau fishermen but also on world seafaring, describing different countries boat design, explorers, as well as ship equipment and technology.  There's also quite a large section about Zheng He, China's greatest seaman, who did some extraordinary things in the early Ming dynasty, taking his massive treasure fleets as far West as Africa.  Some even believe he made it as far as Rhode Island!  While Zheng gets all the credit for his seven voyages I think more needs to be said about the Chinese engineers who designed the ships.  His treasure boats were so big and advanced that larger ones weren't built until the iron steamers of the 19th Century, some 400 years later! 
  
different kinds of sailors knots on the Maritime Museum antique Chinese boat and sailors at the Maritime Museum Inner Harbour display at the Maritime Museum Viking ship display at the Maritime Museum

 

At the back of the museum there's also a small aquarium full of brightly colored fish.  I would love to show you some pics, but the fish made for terrible models.  All we wanted from them was to swim still for a second and smile, but no such luck.

 

Ponte 1 (Pier 1) is located right beside the museum and used to be the place to hop a ferry to Taipa and Coloane, back before they were bridges.  The old pier is now landlocked and home to a long dragon boat, along with a few other nautical exhibits.  The insignia sewn onto the sails of all the caravels during Portugal’s Great Age of Discovery is also prominently displayed there, the Order of Christ, which was established in 1319 by Portugal’s great Poet King, Denis I.

 

Ponte 1 beside the Maritime Museum long dragon boat beside the Maritime Museum Order of the Christ insignia at Ponte 1 at the Maritime Museum

 

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