Titanic (end)+ Back

I saw the Titanic exhibition right after the Human Bodies exhibition, and it felt like a load was taken off my shoulders.  It's not often you can say that about a disaster that killed over 1500 people, but the exhibits were much less nerve racking to view.  Considering the ship is a wreck in the North Atlantic, I questioned going in just how much they'd be able to show us, but I think they did a good job reproducing several sections of the ship, giving people a sense for what it felt like to be on it.  For people such as myself who never saw the movie Titanic or know much about its demise, there was a lot to be gleaned from the exhibition.  

 

large painting of the Titanic
 

The introductory section detailed the planning of the Titanic and the history of its making.  In the next part we boarded the ship to see replicas of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd classes as well as some of the items used there. 

 

First class cabin at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition Grand staircase at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition Elaborate ceiling dome at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition Third class cabin at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition

 

One of the highlights was reading the personal stories of some of the crew and passengers, with 3 or 4 of them being especially heartwrenching.  The exhibition ended with a chronicle of the ship's final hours and the aftermath of the sinking, with included the first news reports of the disaster, the subsequent investigations and insight into its discovery on the ocean floor in 1985.

 

The story of Benjamin Guggenheim at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition Souvenir ribbon plate at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition Expensive silverware at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition Fine dinnerware at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition 

 

As a way to close, I'd like to share some of the things I learned from the fateful voyage of the world's most indestructible ship. 
 

-The captain, Edward Smith, was known more as a socialite captain.  The passengers liked to travel with him because he was personable, funny, and could tell a good story.  He was also old, 62, which worried some people before the boat set off.  Indeed his failure to grasp the enormity of the iceberg's impact led to the delay of emergency procedures, costing unnecessary lives.
 

paper listing ship specifications at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition photograph of captain and crew at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition giant boiler furnace at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition First class cabin hallway at the Venetian Macao Titanic exhibition

 

-The ship was powered by massive boiler rooms located deep in the belly of the ship. 176 men worked around the clock feeding coal into 155 furnaces.
 

-The crew was improperly trained to deal with the disaster, and the lifeboats were often deployed undermanned, often not even halfway full.  They could have saved 500 more people if they had been been filled to capacity.
 

-Not only were the lifeboats undermanned, but there weren't enough of them, only 20 for 1,178 people.  The boat, meanwhile, carried over 2,224 people.  Obviously they never thought they'd ever need them.
 

-The boat hit the iceberg at 11:40 pm.  It was completely sunk by 2:20 am.
 

-The mighty ship split into 2 upon sinking, and fell 12,415 feet to the ocean floor.
 

Tickets are $120 and the exhibition ends on March 31, 2013.  Hours are from 12 to 8 pm daily.

 

 

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