Tai Long Fong

(Last updated: March 20, 2024)

Tai Long Fong is an awesome little restaurant located on the 5th of October Street near the Inner Harbour.

I first visited during Trip Report III and had an awesome lunch there.  For a more detailed review, please follow the link: Tai Long Fong.

What follows below are more recent visits from 2023 and 2024.

***

It’s neither a Top 10 Tip, nor a Top 10 Thing to Do, but trying a dim sum lunch is a great idea for anyone visiting Macau.  I take it as a stress reliever these days, the type of experience where two hours can disappear and be in no hurry to do so. While Long Wa undoubtedly serves better tea, the dim sum at Tai Long Fong is probably a touch more consistent, and I have to start going there a lot more than I am.

Tai Long Fong seating

The restaurant is so representative of Macau that it should be packed with travellers every day, but we’re probably very very lucky that it isn’t. The street it’s on is just as interesting and historically significant as Senado Square, San Ma Lo, or the Street of Happiness but hasn’t caught on in the guidebooks, perhaps because it’s never been refurbished or re-branded as the others have. (And the day that happens is the day it dies. Book it.)

I’ve tried 10 of the dim sum at Tai Long Fong and only 3 of them would qualify as something I wouldn’t order again: Steamed Big Bun with Chicken Fillings ($22), Steamed Dumplings with Pork and Vegetables ($22), and Five Spiced Pork Leg ($26).

Steamed Big Bun with Chicken Fillings at Tai Long Fong Macau
Steamed Big Bun with Chicken Fillings

An utter abomination, the big bun with chicken fillings was a dish that I didn’t even know how to start, let alone finish. There seemed to be no entry point to attack it with, so I ended up grabbing big indiscriminate chunks from it, caveman styles. Dry as a bone, it was an honest to God 0 star dish. I think I might have finished 10% of it before calling it quits.

Steamed Dumplings at Tai Long Fong Macau
Steamed Dumplings

The steamed dumplings didn’t have much flavour to them, probably because they needed a lot less vegetables and much more pork.

Five Spiced Pork Leg at Tai Long Fong
Five Spiced Pork Leg

The pork leg was extremely meaty and not easy to eat absent a fork. A little messy for me, the meat could have benefited from being much less fatty as well.

Apart from those three stragglers, every other dim sum was either 4.5 or 5 stars. Roll out the red carpet for this quartet and order them without hesitation every time you go: Steamed Pork Ribs With Black Bean Sauce ($22), Steamed Fish Balls ($18), Steamed Dumplings with Shrimp and Pork Filling ($28) and Chicken Feet ($22).

Steamed Pork Ribs With Black Bean Sauce at Tai Long Fong
Steamed Pork Ribs With Black Bean Sauce
Steamed Fish Balls at Tai Long Fong
Steamed Fish Balls
Steamed Dumplings with Shrimp and Pork Filling at Tai Long Fong
Steamed Dumplings with Shrimp and Pork Filling
Chicken Feet at Tai Long Fong
Chicken Feet

Just fantastic examples of everything great dim sum is, they all get 5 out of 5 from me.

The next trio is a shade below, but still worth trying nonetheless: Spring Rolls ($21), Steamed Beef Meatballs ($18) and Steamed Translucent Shrimp Dumplings ($28).

Spring Rolls at Tai Long Fong
Spring Rolls
Steamed Beef Meatballs at Tai Long Fong
Steamed Beef Meatballs
Shrimp Dumplings at Tai Long Fong
Shrimp Dumplings

Perhaps you can find better examples of these three dim sum elsewhere, which is the only reason I knocked them down half a star. The flip side is maybe you can’t and this Maven is mistaken, so by all means give them a try and decide for yourself.

The only thing better than the dim sum at Tai Long Fong are the prices, which seem to be visiting us from sometime around 2010.  As legit a teahouse as there is in Macau, Chinese opera performances take over in the afternoon, so make sure you’re gone by 2 pm when that madness begins.

When it’s time to pay up, Tai Long Fong adds a 10% service charge to the bill, and another $8 for a tea and seating fee. The seating fee is customary in Southern China which is something I’ve never understood. I mean, where else are people supposed to do? Sit on the floor??

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